Friday 18 September, 2020

Critical care emergency patients will benefit from equipment donation

(L-R) Anthony Bryan, Armstrong Health Care Inc business development manager, presenting donated medical equipment to Dr Joanne Bradford, QEH head of Accident and Emergency department, and Dr Shantel Young-Boyce, QEH senior registrar

(L-R) Anthony Bryan, Armstrong Health Care Inc business development manager, presenting donated medical equipment to Dr Joanne Bradford, QEH head of Accident and Emergency department, and Dr Shantel Young-Boyce, QEH senior registrar

An estimated one to five critical care patients a day with heart-related conditions and other medical needs entering the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) will benefit from a donation of 11,000 foam electrodes.

Word of this comes from the department's head.

Armstrong Health Care Inc (AHCI) donated the packages of foam electrodes, which will be used with the hospital’s electrocardiograph machines. Dr Joanne Bradford, Head of the A&E Department, and Dr Shantel Young-Boyce, Senior Registrar at the hospital, accepted the donation from AHCI Business Development Manager Anthony Bryan on Friday, January 31.

Bradford described the foam electrodes as a “cost-effective” method of monitoring patients with cardiovascular ailments due to the compatibility with their ECG equipment and longevity of use on the patient during the monitoring process. While the electrodes used currently must move with the monitor machine, the donated foam electrodes can stay in place on a patient’s chest for enhanced ongoing monitoring.

“It is going to come in helpful especially for our critically ill patients, those who need ongoing cardiac monitoring. It is a very welcomed donation to the emergency department because we have quite a few patients daily that need something like this,” stated the QEH physician. Bradford noted the department could attend to about 100 patients on a daily basis with approximately one to five percent needing acute cardiac monitoring.

Armstrong Health Care Inc has had a business relationship with the QEH for about six years providing medical supplies and pharmaceuticals. Bryan said that a collaboration with Bradford and A&E department consultant Dr. Reginald King identified the need for the special foam electrodes.

Bradford acknowledged that the “high-stress, busy” emergency department, which serves as a nexus between the community and QEH, has its challenges. On average, about 30 personnel could be working a shift as a team to help provide care to patients who pass through the A&E department, including those in need of critical care. Therefore, philanthropic support provided by companies like AHCI is appreciated as it “helps us to offer better care,” stated Bradford.

“One of our thrusts going forward for 2020 and beyond is looking at our philanthropic efforts to various entities, not just the Queen Elizabeth Hospital but other key government entities that we work with across the eastern Caribbean,” noted Bryan while speaking about the first-time QEH donation valued at over BBD $5,000.

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